Wednesday , May 18 2022

Astronomers investigate the history of the universe's star formation Astronomy



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Astronomers believe that our universe was the first stars of a hundred millions of years ago. Ever since then, the universe has become a star-making tour de force. Today there are about two billion galaxies and trillion trillion stars. Using new Starlight measurement methods, astronomers studied NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray telescope data to determine the largest part of the universe's existence in the formation of stars.

NASA's Fermi Gamma Radiation Telescope Spacer Extracellular Ultra-Light Measurement 739 Blazars shows the location. The background shows the sky as shown in the gamma ray, with more than 10 million electrons energy from the nine years of the Fermi Grand Area Telescope. Our Milky Way Galaxy plane is in the middle of the plot. Image Credits: NASA / DOE / Fermi LAT partnership.

NASA's Fermi Gamma Radiation Telescope Spacer Extracellular Ultra-Light Measurement 739 Blazars shows the location. The background shows the sky as shown in the gamma ray, with more than 10 million electrons energy from the nine years of the Fermi Grand Area Telescope. Our Milky Way Galaxy plane is in the middle of the plot. Image Credits: NASA / DOE / Fermi LAT partnership.

One of the main goals of the Fermi mission was to evaluate the extragalactic backbone (EBL), a rigid fog formed by all stars of bright stars, spectators and infrared, created above the universe's history.

"From Fermi's telescopes, we were able to measure the amount of sweat ever," said Marco Ajello, astronomer at Clemson University.

"Most of this light emits stars that reside in the galaxies, so it has the ability to better understand the evolution of the star evolution and create the light content of the universe."

Dr. Ajell and co-authors analyzed almost nine-year-olds about the 739 Blazars gamma radius.

"Blazers are galaxies, supermassive black holes that release gaps from the galaxies and small molecules that release small structures of energy that emit light at almost the speed of the light".

"When one of these jets is shown directly on the ground, it is far from detectable although it is far from it."

Ultraviolet rays of the gas rays hit the cosmic cloud, leaving the trace of the observer.

This allows astronomers to measure the density of the cloud, not only in a certain place, but also at a particular moment in the history of the Universe.

"Gamma rays are the most energy-efficient light energy, which is so energetic that they have extraordinary interactions with the star. When the right-angled frequencies are blown, Albert Einstein's equation can be converted through E = mc2"Said Dr. Alberto Domínguez, astrophysicist at the Complutense University in Madrid.

"Gamma ray photos are traveling through a cloud of clouds with high probability of absorption," said Dr. Ajell.

"We measured how many photograms were measured in photon, how to measure and measure the thickness of the cloud, according to time, there was a lot of light throughout the wavelength."

According to the new measurement, the number of photons emitted by stars (visible light particles) returns 4 * 1084.

"Using blazars using us at different distances, it measures the total star at different times," said Dr. Vaidehi Paliya, PhD Researcher at Clemson University.

"We measured the total stars of each period – billion years ago, two million years ago, six million years ago, etc. – all the stars were created for the first time."

"This enabled the EBL to be reconstructed and to effectively determine the history of the universe's form more effectively than before."

The study was published in the newspaper Science.

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S. Abdollahi et al. (Fermi-LAT partnership). 2018. Determination of the gamma ray nature of the star-shaped universe. Science 362 (6418): 1031-1034; doi: 10.1126 / science.aat8123

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