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It's official: to find a shark with real odds



AUSTRALIAN researchers claimed 135 times more that a swimmer would find a dolphin than a shark on the beach.

A video captured by a drone shows a large white shark, a decade and a bull shark on the north coast of NSW, but dolphins, whales and many plagues.

Brendan Kelaher, a professor of Marine Science and Management at the Southern Cross University, said the goal of this study was to analyze the feasibility of using jets to help improve beach safety, resulting in unexpected results in the capture of sea creatures. in any other way.

The research was carried out by Kelaher and a group of Southern Cross University, in collaboration with the NSW Primary Industries Department, within the NSW $ 16 million shark management strategy.

The Great White Shark was observed on the north coast of NSW. The image captured a drone used for research. Credit: Southern Cross University and NSW DPI.

The Great White Shark was observed on the north coast of NSW. The image captured a drone used for research. Credit: Southern Cross University and NSW DPI.

Storm rays were seen on the north coast of NSW. Credit: Southern Cross University and NSW DPI.

Storm rays were seen on the north coast of NSW. Credit: Southern Cross University and NSW DPI.

The group uses drones to control beaches by Byron Bay, Ballina, Lennox Head and Evans Head, where they recorded shark bumps in the past.

More than 4100 seabed beasts were registered, but Kelaher, 47, said that there were more dolphins than sharks.
"Over the past five years, you will see that there are some dangerous sharks in these beaches, but they are quite common," he said.

"The marine life of marine life is incredibly different.

"It's phenomenal, we saw massive rays of over 400 animals and they're made up of crazy geometric models, just like someone in Photoshop."

Professor Kelaher said the dolphins played with sharks and deceived cormorants or sting rays.

"They have big brain and it's been really fun," he said.

"That's why there is a greater chance of seeing dolphins on the beach, because they are really interesting and interesting."

Drone pilot and professor Brendan Kelaher at Charlesworth Bay National Marine Science Center. NSW DPI uses dams for controlling the beaches over the last three years within the NSW Shark Management Strategy. The Southern Cross University research team carefully studied the drone footage and counted more than 4100 marine animals. Source: Elise Derwin

Drone pilot and professor Brendan Kelaher at Charlesworth Bay National Marine Science Center. NSW DPI uses dams for controlling the beaches over the last three years within the NSW Shark Management Strategy. The Southern Cross University research team carefully studied the drone footage and counted more than 4100 marine animals. Source: Elise Derwin

According to the Academy, drones became a useful tool for controlling beach safety.

"A dragon may find sharks, people know with a sirens to get out of the water," he said.

"Or if someone steals the stolen catches, they drop their personal flotation device and it's an alarm sound, adding the ability to keep our people safe."

Professor Kelaher also said that he was given a new way to get knowledge about sea fauna.

"Drone is a fantastic technology, because it has given us an eye on what we have not faced in front of, leaving the helicopters to keep things away, with drones, we do not have marine fauna."

"It is a stunning surprise at the amazing dolphins and beaches like Bryde's Whales.

"We watched them feed a few meters from the sea. Whales swam and dolphins were forgiven by the way, it was really spectacular."

Research findings have been published in Marine and Freshwater Research.


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