Sunday , June 13 2021

Meet Melbourne men to become the master mission in Mars



Mark Fittock, at the age of 34, left school in 2001 and took a double degree in Monash University in astrophysics and mechanical engineering.

Mark Fittock, at the age of 34, left school in 2001 and took a double degree in Monash University in astrophysics and mechanical engineering.Credit:DLR

Mars's tests on Mars (well, and sometimes not), will use a robotic arm to spread a "mole" more than five meters below the surface, allowing a long tail-laden tail. Here, it will measure Mart's life signs: how much heat is hot in the stream above the planet.

With these data, hopefully, they will give you new news about the neighbor's new anatomies as well as the creation of a solar system.

Fittock, at the age of 34, left school in 2001 and graduated from the University of Monash in astrophysics and mechanical engineering. It was an unusual but deliberate combination: he wanted to work on space technology.

Seven years ago, DLR found "good luck or a good chance," he said as a "mole development test".

The work was introduced as a 25-year-old director of the group, "Susanna" as a skin segment, to cover the mole, keep it safe, drive and read again to the ground. .

"We had to break a lot of the Pardon but the ground," says Fittock.

Many moles reliably worked in Martian environment.

"We do not know what we are going to do well," he says. I do not like it and have a look.

"We can make inventions from what we can see from the orbit, but a little bit below it we need to do wider and wider inventions.

"We'll go somewhere else".

The heat flow and physical properties probe, the short HP3, goes down almost five meters taller) The surface of Mars.

The heat flow and physical properties probe, the short HP3, goes down almost five meters taller) The surface of Mars.Credit:Mark Fittock

His team's first mole challenge was achieved to get enough in-depth tasting data.

1 kilogram and 30 cm long will sink and the sand will sink, driving sand and rock and filling it behind.

"How to test this work," a very sandin sandpit ".

"It's a short, really, very difficult one," says Fittock.

"It was more time than expected, and at that time it was very harmful, but thumps and thumps away. There was a great technical challenge, how can we make it stronger."

That Mars's gravity could give him a hand, leading him to land more than the Earth's equivalent.

But they also hope to rock rocks.

The concept of this artist depicts NASA's InSight plots after deploying Martian Skin Tools.

The concept of this artist depicts NASA's InSight plots after deploying Martian Skin Tools.Credit:NASA

"For us, they took a pleasant landing for us, we should join one another and we can avoid rocky rocks," he says.

But there will be a "nail biting moment," he says, when they see the surface of the earthquake, it can be sure that it is something that is open to bleach.

Even though the moles could penetrate the sand, they would be rocks below the skin. Some break it, others may travel, but some may exceed 5 meters in depth.

The InSight Territory in Marsen ... everything goes according to the plan.

The InSight Territory in Marsen … everything goes according to the plan.Credit:NASA / JPL-Caltech

The burrowing process that begins next year will be slow and responsible. When Molota receives a problem, he will stop to study the group's residence and strategies.

Another problem is the landing of the Fittock team out of control.

Space-engineer will go to dinner with classmates.

"I will be there while I'm trying to find my professional phone while I'm trying to get it on the ground as a nerve, but the dinner is great, I think everyone wants to see."

Regardless of the risks, Fittock says he is confident that his "scientific systems" are enough.

"We're getting a better picture of what's going on in March, but how March came about, how Mars came from the beginning of the solar system, and the improvement of our solar system.

At work

"We rarely emphasize how little we know about everything outside the Earth and also on the Earth."

Fittock will lead to a new company, OHB Bremen, as the head of the future space exploration missions project.

He is currently working on the mission called Hera, along with NASA, to go on a weekly weekly wallet and break the spacecraft.

It will give you valuable ideas: If you see a "Earth-Killer" asteroid coming to Earth, it will be deadly.

"We have learned in recent years that what we expect from asteroid and comet was to be different in many essential ways," says Fittock.

"We want to know what happens when this happens."

Nick Miller is European correspondent Sydney Morning Herald and Age


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