Monday , January 25 2021

Scientists have only identified the Universal Formula Genetic "Monogamy"



What does monogamous species mean? The new research has shown that the universal genetic code emphasizes one monogamy one by one.

Every year hundreds of millions are doing animals & # 39 ;. But these were not all the same things, although they look very similar to animals.

Some species, like small prairie volumes, are monogamous, only in the limits defined for the execution of the wild, the constant relationship and the commitment. Then it's a meadow. For them, nothing goes.

So what does it give? Why is there such a significant difference, almost equal to the almost indistinguishable (most of us) habits of their parents?

According to the new study, the answer can be expected to be expected more.

Basically, in the genus of animals genes appear monogamous and specific species become monogamy.

"Our research has been evolving over 450 million years ago, all of these beings had a common ancestor," says Rebecca Young, a biographer and evolutionary biologist at the Austin University.

"Most people would not expect more than 450 million years ago that transitions in these complex behaviors would happen at the same time."

016 monogamy animal genetic formula 2Historic evolution of more than 10 species of monogamy history and 24 genes identified (Austin University of Austin)

However, from a high genetic point of view, Young and his team have found it.

The researchers analyzed male brains of 10 different species, including five pairs, at the same time monogamous and non-monogamous species.

In addition to the above references, the animals had mumps, birds, frogs and fish monogamous and non-monogamous.

When the group analyzed genetic activity during the genome of these 10 genes, 24 gene-related monogamous systemic hormones were identified in vertebrates.

In other words, regardless of whether you had scale, skin or feathers, it is possible to determine the same type of gene evolution pattern as the tendency for each species to be monogamous.

At least that's the hypothesis, but what about people? Is our sexuality a way that matches the neural genes expression patterns?

"We do not know that," admitted Hans Hofmann, an investigator and integrator biologist Science, but "we had specific spectrum types … maybe [show up] as well as in humans ".

016 monogamy animal genetic formula 2Learned frogs: non-monogamous strawberry poison frog (left) and mimicking monogamous poison frog (Yusan Yan and James Tumulty)

Determine what is going to be the future study, but really be sure to find out if this shared model is really universal.

When researchers looked at 10 different species, we probably knew that a shared genetic code could be carried out at least five times over the last 450 million years, as monogamous and non-monogamous animals could change.

In monogamy, genes related to different types of cognitive functions, including neural development, synaptic activity and memory, were regulated, other genes related to transcription gene were regulated.

"These differences may be more plastic neurality in the face of a narrow transcriptional regulation of male monogamy", explained the researchers.

There is much more research to say about the genetic code of the monogamy, and these genes suggest that 24 genes do not suggest parity and loneliness.

But the researchers have said that any force to make animals together, to live or to the end of the season. That way, they might solve problems.

"You have to endure an animal after another for a long time, which is not easy," said Hoffman The Guardian.

"When they get rid of your food, they take away your shelters, they hurt you or your sick ones."

But despite fears, threats and frustrations, nature and monogamy somehow conspires to do all that it deserves.

"What's been going on is brilliant," Hoffman said.

"When we get married, or we need to take care of our children, we get the reward, stolen the award-winning system," Hey, I love that. "

Discoveries have been reported PNAS.


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