Wednesday , October 20 2021

Toxic Tortoises may force the reef control to change water tests



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The Great Barrier Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) does not test cobalt in the water quality regime.

The green turtle is a vulnerable species in Australian waters, but the International Protection Union is at risk.

More than 2400 green turtles have been tested to make annual chemical checks.

More than 2400 green turtles have been tested to make annual chemical checks.

Scientists believe that the green turtle could be a green maritime sign for the Canary Islands in the coal mine, giving rise to early chemical chemistry introduced in the Great Hazard System.

WWF Australia's Marine Species Project Director Christine Anne Madden Hof said that cobalt could also cause toxicity to other species. "

"We believe that turtles have found turtles extracted from natural sources and human sources," Madden Hof said.

"The ratio of cobalt found in turtle blood and spills is consistent with Upstart Bay's acute exposure to cobalt in 2012".

Riverstown floods around Upstart Bay near Townsville. Scientists believe that chemical traces can be eaten by green turtles in oil.

Riverstown floods around Upstart Bay near Townsville. Scientists believe that chemical traces can be eaten by green turtles in oil.

Eye injuries were found on the 23rd of the Green Turtle Upstart Bay and 10 percent of the green turtles surrounding Cleveland Bay were found.

"Pre-existing reef monitoring programs do not make any pollution against our projects, so we're asking for a wider range of chemical products, including metals," Madden Hof said.

"If all those pollutants have been found in two coastal locations, what is happening in other reefs and in large estuaries?

"Turtles are good reef health indicators, because they absorb chemicals in the environment.

"Using the methods developed for this project, poor water quality and chemical contamination can provide early quality and early warning."

Changes in water quality analysis were considered, the GBRMPA spokesman confirmed.

"Marine Park Authority's marine monitoring program tests sediment, food and pesticides, in terms of water quality, the greatest risks to the reef," he said.

"We are currently developing the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program, the priority monitoring indicators and the methods, locations and frequency measurement indicators."

This new test program will end in 2019.

An extensive field of experts has been advocating priority and priority indicators.

Currently, the turtle protection plan is a recovery plan for Australia's Australian Sea Turtle, a Reef 2050 long-term Sustainability Plan and the Queensland Marine Turtle Conservation Strategy.

"We accept as independent research and all relevant research (WWF) report based on our usual review processes and current management plans," said the spokesman.

Tony Moore is a senior reporter at Brisbane Times

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