Thursday , December 9 2021

COVID-19 Contact Layout: SA Parafield Cluster



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SA COVID is expanding one of the largest contact exercises for the new cluster. So how are they doing? And what happened to the QR code and ID scan command?

South Australia was praised for its continued follow-up to the COVID-19 outbreak earlier this year, and has announced QR codes, ID scanning and a $ 1.7 million boost system to be ready for another outbreak. But Sunday’s appearance introduced many of those systems still a few weeks earlier. So how does our contract layout work? What would be presented? And where are those programs now?

CONTACT SEARCH

SA contacts are tracked by interviewing people who have tested positive for COVID-19 to determine who they have been in contact with and then to whom and from whom they may receive.

The number of positive coronavirus cases in the new SA cluster has reached 20 actual and presumed cases.

Fifteen cases are part of the original family set that was unveiled on Sunday, and are believed to have originated from a medi-hotel. The other two cases are related.

Two of the cases are related to care facilities for unnamed seniors and another works at Hungry Jack in Port Adelaide. The old care facility and Hungry Jack’s restaurant are closed. Mawson Lakes in Primary and Kindergarten, as in Thomas More College and Parafield Plaza shopping center.

The cases are the first community transmission in the state since April 15.

SA Health is in the process of contacting anyone who may have a close relationship with COVID-19 confirmed cases and potential cases.

They were in contact with anyone who was in the Lyell McEwin Hospital Emergency Service on Friday, Nov. 13 and Saturday, Nov. 14, from 4:30 p.m. It may be closely related to a confirmed case of COVID-19.

However, if you have visited this location during this time and have not contacted SA Health, you should immediately put yourself in self-quarantine and call SA COVID-19 Information at 1800 253 787.

If you have visited any of the locations below during the time listed, you do not need to self-quarantine, but you should monitor and test for symptoms immediately if symptoms appear:

TEST

Symptoms of COVID-19 may include fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny nose, shortness of breath, or loss of taste or smell.

If you have any concerns about your health, contact your doctor. (…)

You are at home if you are sick.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, even if it is mild, take a test.

If possible, keep a distance of 1.5 meters from the others.

Wash your hands with soap and water or wash your hands.

CLICK HERE TO FIND A TEST STATION

WILL THE BOUNDARIES BE NARROW? WILL WE RETURN TO THE LOCK?

Police Commissioner Grant Stevens SA said the next 48 hours will be crucial in determining whether changes should be made to current protocols. He said returning to the restrictions imposed during the pandemic would be “the worst case scenario”.

HEALTH’S 1.7 M $ IT WITH NEW PROGRAMS

On Saturday, SA Health announced a $ 1.7 million increase in hiring tracing systems.

The new central computer program will replace handwritten whiteboard systems and teams will be able to juggle nearly three times as many virus cases in a second-wave outbreak.

The system, which would be available online in a few weeks, would centrally develop “high-quality” data and send automated text messages to patients.

It would help speed up the verification of sources of infection and monitor contacts within 48 hours so that they can be quarantined earlier.

Authorities warned authorities of the dangers of lying in confidential conversations for the first time to recover the origins of their ability to be aware of the duration of the virus.

This news came before the newly created day at SA.

QR CODES AND ID SCAN

To alleviate SA’s restrictions next week, which would encourage new contact tracing systems, authorities said early this month would allow new cases of the virus to be quickly identified and isolated.

The system has not yet been submitted to the SA, which is currently facing a serious and growing occurrence of clusters.

The system would include “quick response” QR codes and identification scanners.

The commission’s report shows that in early June the prime minister and cabinet department began investigating “technical options” to facilitate attendance and record keeping of contacts, such as those used in places like New Zealand.

SA Health, SA Police, officials of the Liquor Authorization Commission – part of the Attorney General’s department – and the DPC are involved in its development.

It is based on a successful introduction to New South Wales and Queensland. The sites have reported success and ease of use. Victoria is also researching similar solutions.

The QR code is a barcode that can read information available on your phone’s camera and special QR code reader applications in Apple and Android stores.

Codes can store any type of information, including a person’s name, phone number, and address.

WHAT DOES THE QR CODE HAVE TO SAY ABOUT PREMISES?

Codes can be downloaded as many times as needed.

“It simply requires (premises owners) to re-download the secure COVID plan and obtain the QR code logo and place it around their headquarters,” Police Commissioner Grant Stevens, who is the state’s COVID coordinator, told the advertiser. he said this month.

“It doesn’t have to be put on a door, it can be a table or a bar, a resting place. It’s just a matter of allowing people to scan their code. “

Stevens said the information contained in QR codes or scanners will be used immediately by identifiable patrons who may be in contact with an infected person.

WHAT IF I DON’T HAVE AN OLD PHONE?

Stevens said the identification scanners can be used to take pictures of a person’s driver’s license, business card, or any other contact information they had.

WHAT ARE THESE NECESSARY SYSTEMS?

Professor Nicola Spurrier, head of public health in South Australia, said it was essential to be able to quickly identify anyone who might have a close relationship with the COVID-19 infectious patient that their team is tracing.

“My team needs to get a quarantine in 48 hours if we want to stop the transmission,” he said. “If we don’t interrupt that transmission chain it can get out of control very quickly.”

WHAT WILL HAPPEN IN MY DATA?

Mr Stevens, along with Prime Minister Steven Marshall, wanted to stress that they will protect the data.

Stevens said the information will be stored by the SA government and deleted within 28 days.

“It’s a whole principle to capture that information, so if there’s a confirmed occurrence from the place we’re able to access it as quickly as possible and get in touch with those people,” Steven said.

“Then it will be a critical isolation condition for people who are positive.”

“This means that we need to have the data in a relatively short period of time – one or two incubation cycles (14 or 28 days) – once that is over, the data will be deleted.”

Marshall said “customers need to know that data will be protected.”

He said it will be used in a much safer environment than it is today in the short term, as they now have handwritten records in many places.

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