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University of WA: new technology survives in the plastic bag, in a plastic bag that mimics the stomach



Baby Leighton launched 760 grams when born in 2018. Doctors call it "viable" and, even if parents needed reconstruction, they went south.

"When they ask," Are you sure? Are you sure? "" Bree Vine dear said 7 News. "They told me they had long-lasting problems."

Leighton survived. It was sealed in an oxygen-filled plastic bag that helped develop weak lungs.

"I was scared," Breek said. "I felt I would just touch it, I felt I would break it. It was so small and so fragile."

mother

Brearen's baby was born 17 weeks before. Photo: 7 news

"Technology imitates in the uterus"

The use of plastic bags for incubating babies is not new technology. The lambs have been stripped of the researchers since 2017.

Bags with lambs are filled with amniotic liquids and are linked to an artificial plazenta. Devices represent early animals in the uterus.

Children born in 23 weeks are usually placed in the incubator and ventilation helps them breathe. According to Philadelphia Children's Hospital, it can damage pulmonary development.

"The challenges we are trying to compensate are a 23-24-week-old baby, who is struggling to adapt to the uterus outside of the uterus, in dry droughts, when breathing in the air, are still not supposed," Emily Partridge Dr said BBC.

In Australia, about 68 babies are born every day. 23 weeks of pregnancy have a 20 to 30 percent survival rate.

8th

Leighton is eight months healthy now. Photo: 7 news

"It's a miracle and a half"

When an eight-month-old baby is healthy, Leighton WA is the smallest survival necessity.

"It's a miracle and a half," said his mother proudly. "Even though doctors have said they are challenged by all odds."


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