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Camp Free Land: Indigenous mothers say the G1's dreams and children's future



4,000 indigenous countries participated with Terra Livre in Brazil. From Tuesday to Friday (26), Esplanada dos Ministérios was a stage of resistance and culture. Amongst the audience, hundreds of women chose to protest their children to take their children in the middle of power.

In the midst of the battle for rights, the care of the younger children was shared with all "relatives". After all, Kaingang, a young man from Rio Grande do Sul, said that "all peoples seek protection for children, they are our future."

Talk about the rights and future of these peoples G1 He talked with the indigenous women in the ceremony, mother and grandparents. In total, about 150 ethnic groups were sent by representatives on the 15th of the district.

See that indigenous women expect the future of their children and peoples:

  • Jaqueline de Paula, Rio Grande do Sul
Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov - Photo: Marília Marques / G1Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov - Photo: Marília Marques / G1

Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov – Photo: Marília Marques / G1

In the ethnic group Kaingang, Jaqueline de Paula was 16 years old when he was his first child. Today, at the age of 20, he is second to Camp Terra Livre.

In order to get this year's edition, indigenous women face 2.1 kilometers of road – from Rio Grande do Sul to the Federal District. This time, his son, Vitor Petit, has been present for 4 years.

Although it is difficult to travel by bus and almost two-day journeys, Jaquelin has said that "it deserves effort". The goal is, he said, "to seek more rights to limit indigenous land".

Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov - Photo: Marília Marques / G1Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov - Photo: Marília Marques / G1

Jaqueline de Paula and son, Vitor, 4, at the Terra Livre in Brasov – Photo: Marília Marques / G1

The town that lives with the family with the young woman The capital city of Porto Alegre is over two hours. There are no schools and health messages there, he says. All basic service services depend on the structure of other regional cities.

"There are no schools in the country and they have to go to the White College for six years."

The indigenous women who did not finish their secondary education due to difficulties say that their son is worried in the future.

"I would not be happy if you needed to learn from the village."

Jaquelin wants her children to know the world culture, but also among her people.

"It's not the same," he says, "I feel more at home because they have all the relatives.

  • Bruna Xokleng, Santa Catarina
Bruna Xokleng, her son, 1 to 4 months old, breastfeed her at Terra Livre Livre in Brazil - Photo: Marília Marques / G1 Bruna Xokleng, her son, 1 to 4 months old, breastfeed her at Terra Livre Livre in Brazil - Photo: Marília Marques / G1

Bruna Xokleng, her son, 1 to 4 months old, breastfeed her at Terra Livre Livre in Brazil – Photo: Marília Marques / G1

The Bruna nutrition student at Xiangleng lives the same problem as in Rio Grande do Sul from Santa Catarina.

With a small child, 23-year-old youth said G1 In the nursery, it is divided into one year and a half, trying to keep up with the town every day.

Three years ago, he had to leave town, in the town of Santa Catarina in Ibiarra, to go to the university of Florianópolis.

"It is desirable that what they do today will be reflected later [filho]"he said.

"I did not want to leave the village, but now I have to study and work and have someone."

To participate in the camp in Brasilia, he has decided to take part in the ceremony to represent students who are "in the universities", "he explained." It is very difficult to be there and study. "

Bruna says "feeling" is doing something for the future of her son. "

"It's important that our children learn at those meetings." Thus, Gilmara Akai, a three-year-old son from Paramako Munduruku, views the participation of indigenous peoples.

First, he participates in the Camp Terra Livre in Brazil. The ministry, through the esplanade field, Miguel runs his bow and arrow, in the days of three events.

Miguel Akai, 4, Munduruku people (PA) - Photo: Marília Marques / G1Miguel Akai, 4, Munduruku people (PA) - Photo: Marília Marques / G1

Miguel Akai, 4, Munduruku people (PA) – Photo: Marília Marques / G1

When the smile was exchanged with his mother, the older boy's movements kept an eye on manifestations already. From the hand, mother and son took part in the middle of the capital on Friday (26) and cried out in defense of indigenous rights.

"When I was about 12 years old, I want to put the practice of talking about these issues, the caciques and the warriors of our country."

The talk of Camp Livre Terra (that is, the largest of the traditional Brazilian villages) began on Tuesday (23) and was scheduled on Friday (26). Subject, this year, "Indigenous blood, more falls".

Indigenous peoples reach the ministry's sculptures at Terra Libre Livre 15º - Photo: Marcelo Coelho / TV GloboIndigenous peoples reach the ministry's sculptures at Terra Libre Livre 15º - Photo: Marcelo Coelho / TV Globo

Indigenous peoples reach the ministry's sculptures at Terra Libre Livre 15º – Photo: Marcelo Coelho / TV Globo

The group is against the proposal of municipal health services and protests against the final measures of the federal government, such as the Funai change with the Ministry of Justice.

Read more about G1 DF in the region.


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