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Einstein's brain and modern scientist, a revolutionary scientist Science and Health



"My grandmother has helped me with a large uterine tumor, age 42, during the pregnancy process," said American scientists. "But it was wrong! My mother was 75 years old and I was 80 years old", Diamond wrote her essay on her life and career in 2007.

He looks at the brain and revolutionizes the way we understand it, and its legacy as a university professor has inspired doctors, researchers and scientists to generate a generation.

Married to mothers and daughters, Marian Diamond was born in California in 1926. - Photo Courtesy: Diamond Family (via BBC)Married to mothers and daughters, Marian Diamond was born in California in 1926. - Photo Courtesy: Diamond Family (via BBC)

Married to mothers and daughters, Marian Diamond was born in California in 1926. – Photo Courtesy: Diamond Family (via BBC)

Diamond, walking in the University of California at Berkeley, had a habit, dressed in elegance, wearing a floral print case to carry a hat.

"When you look at a lady with a hat with a hat, you can not imagine what she is wearing," he joked to the students in 2010.

Within the elegant box, Diamond was in love with the body of the human body when he fell in love as a teenager.

"Compares anything," said My Love Affair with the Brain documentary.

"That's really, if you take away the brain, you take away people," he said with a brain in his hand.

Diamond is one of the founders of modern neuroscience. - Photo: UC Berkeley Photos / Elena Zhukova (via the BBC)Diamond is one of the founders of modern neuroscience. - Photo: UC Berkeley Photos / Elena Zhukova (via the BBC)

Diamond is one of the founders of modern neuroscience. – Photo: UC Berkeley Photos / Elena Zhukova (via the BBC)

The most complex mass of the earth

Diamond was born in California on November 11, 1926. "At age 15, I saw my first human brain in the Los Angeles County Hall corridor, behind my father, he visited the sick," he wrote.

He said that a door was open, and there was a little table in the room in the room. Four men dressed in white clothes.

"I do not know what they were doing, but before the ideas came up, the image of that brain was permanently in my mind. The image is so clear that it was already yesterday."

"It was a wonderful idea: this brain was the mass of the most complex protoplasm in Earth and who knows our galaxy," he said.

Diamond says he said something inside that he could learn more about that noble part of the human body.

It was time Little time

At the age of 21, Diamond graduated in biology and began research on the nervous system at the Department of Anatomy of the University of Berkeley in 1948.

Shortly thereafter, he became an assistant professor.

At that time, "no one has studied the anatomy of cognitive functions."

However, he found something that caught the department that had worked on hormone studies: the hypothalamus.

"How could four-legged functions of the nerve tissue be?" He recalled his attempt.

Thus, he started his career as a researcher and teacher for almost 60 years.

Professor George Brooks, one of his university colleagues, says Diamond has "anatomically proven for the first time what brain we call plasticity."

"By doing so, the brain broke the old paradigm that the brain saw as a static and unchanging body," added Brooks.

Diamond's pioneering research on the effect of enriching the stimulating environment and the development of brain development "literally changed the world, about how we think about ourselves," says professor and colleagues. article researcher

Diamonds discovered peculiarities in Einstein's brain. - Photo: public domainDiamonds have found Einstein's brain peculiarities. - Photo: public domain

Diamonds discovered peculiarities in Einstein's brain. – Photo: public domain

Marian Diamond completed her career as an integrative biology professor at Berkeley University, retiring in 2014. At the age of 90, he died three years later.

The university rewarded: "One of the founders of modern neuroscience was the first person to change the brain with experience and improve the wealth and find Albert Einstein's brain in his brain."

The biologist asked the father of the brain of Theory of Relativity. A few years later he received samples from the Einstein organ.

He started studying the brain of one of the most important scientists in the world of diamonds.

The researcher "earned a reputation in 1984, analyzed fragments of Einstein's brain and had more cellular support than the average person," said the university.

In an article published in 1985 by a neurosurgeon, he said that the Nobel Prize in Physics had more cellulose glial than the control group that participated in the experiment.

Glial cells favor neurones and actively intervene in the processing of information. The text confirmed that the brain of Einstein had a strange genius to explain his genius.

In the trial of 2007, the neuroscientist himself reflects the uniqueness.

"Increasing the wealth of cells, Albert Einstein had a hypothesis that had more glacial cell glucose, specifically in the left and right areas of 9 and 39 in comparison with the average cortical area, with 11 men."

"We found four regions more glial cells than other males, but the area around 39 was much more than statistically"

After several years of research on Einstein's brain, Diamond has conducted routine laboratory research, it was essential "an enriching environment (toys and companies) changing the anatomy of the brain," says UC Berkeley.

"The implication was that the brains of all animals, including humans, could benefit some enriched environments and reduce the ability to learn poor settings (stimuli and activities)."

Inspired by investigations by the researcher at McGill University (Canada), Donald Hebb, Berkeley made an experiment with young rats: 12 of them placed them in a "caste rich" and another in another cage. "impoverished" – small and without toys.

"The rats that grew up in a compulsory enriched environment made better labyrinths than" poor rat growers without surveys and stimulations ", explains the neuroscientist in his essay.

Rodents that grew as a group were more solitary and bored than acetylcholinesterase than rat, brain chemistry.

He came to the leaders of Diamond's investigation and asked him to join his team. They were admitted and one of the major discoveries of the project came from that unity.

The biologist participated in the experiment under the lens of small parts of the rodents, which placed the thickness of his cortex.

"The enriched rats were more serious than cerebral weasels … They were much earlier than those of the poor … They saw structural changes in their brain in their early life based on different types of experiences."

One year later, in 1963, the experiment was repeated by other rodents and had a similar result.

Diamond remembers David Krech's experimental and social psychology offices to bring the documents to his findings.

"They read, looked at it and immediately said:" This is the only one. It will change the scientific thinking of the brain, "says Diamond.

The results were published in 1964 and the year later the researcher discovered his findings at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Anatomists.

There were hundreds of people in the room, but he said "little women". "I was very scared (when I submitted the project)." As soon as I explained it, the audience pleased with delight, and then a man rose and said: "Miss, the brain can not be changed."

"But I felt safe and said:" Excuse me, sir, but we show the initial experiment and change experiment. "This trust is the beauty of anatomy."

The brain can change any age

Diamond and his team analyze the importance of astrocytes, a kind of brain cell. - Photo: PixabayDiamond and his team analyze the importance of astrocytes, a kind of brain cell. - Photo: Pixabay

Diamond and his team analyze the importance of astrocytes, a kind of brain cell. – Photo: Pixabay

One of the major contributions of Diamond has been to understand the structural components of the cerebral cortex that these changes may be at any age.

This means that you can continue developing over the years, helping to improve your immune system's constant stimulation.

Faced with the aging population, this effect is optimistic, indicating that the cortex maintains the plasticity of the elderly.

Diamond's understanding of the experiments also helps us improve our capacity, despite the biology-genetic life lottery.

The phrase "use or lose" is related to the importance of keeping the brain active and its relevance to the challenges and lifelong learning.

"The more people understand the structure and functions of their bodies, which are affected by the nervous system and the early stages of life, will be a healthy and pleasant period of 50 years," he wrote in 2007. .

He also concluded: "In short, our results show a healthy brain for at least five major factors: diet, exercise, challenges, newness and love.

In regards to love, the diamond touched and considered the lab rats explained that life was longer.

As a university professor, Diamond had his relationship with his students; Jeff, his son, tells BBC News World (BBC service in Spanish).

"He was very dear," he says. "When we went to the hospital, it was a great opportunity to meet a former student, who was already a doctor, who told us about the good experience with the lesson, the only teacher I know every week, at random, to learn more about their interests at lunch time."

As a scientist, a large part of his research was done in the laboratory. There, above all, he set up a group of women formed by women.

"He liked his work and always gave credit for research," continues Jeff.

Daniela Kaufer, lecturer at the Department of Integration of Biology Berkeley, says Diamond knew that the day was "special."

"I was a young assistant teacher, when I saw Diamond, it was like finding a rock star." For Kaufer, Diamond's contributions were not only seen as the "potential plasticity of the adult brain", but to understand the main role played by astrocytes in this plasticity.

Astrocytes are the main and most frequent types of glial cells, and Einstein's brain studies have stressed that these cells initially thought they were studying the nutrition of other brain components.

In 1953, Diamond became a mother and recorded the importance of that moment.

"The newest daughter of the first daughter I ever lived and was the most amazing thing I hugged on my chest. Then I learned why I was there," he wrote.

A diamond with her 3 children (a daughter later) combines family life with research and lessons. - Photo: Generosity: Diamond Family (via the BBC)A diamond with her 3 children (a daughter later) combines family life with research and lessons. - Photo: Generosity: Diamond Family (via the BBC)

A diamond with her 3 children (a daughter later) combines family life with research and lessons. – Photo: Generosity: Diamond Family (via the BBC)

He had three other children: Catherine Richard, Jeff and Ann.

When he started early, Jeff realized that his mother was unusual, not only because he was a brilliant scientist, but because "other mothers did not do things".

"He went to our school to talk about science, and he could see a brain, a skeleton or a few eyes on the boat and all the surrounding areas."

After maternity, she spent less time working, she says. But "after dinner, we made notes and we prepared the classes the following day".

On some weekends, children were taken to college to do their research. From the laboratory window, while playing at the campus garden.

Diamond in his investigations realized that the brain promoted physical exercise. - Photo: PixabayDiamond in his investigations realized that the brain promoted physical exercise. - Photo: Pixabay

Diamond in his investigations realized that the brain promoted physical exercise. – Photo: Pixabay

Sometimes children were allowed in the lab; There the rats saw "toys" in a cage.

"As a child, we thought:" Well, that's what all parents do. "But, as an adult, you think," How can all this research, teach and create a family? "Richard asks.

"Now I am a father, I can not imagine how he was doing at camps and trips, how he could do typical family activities, while teaching and researching. We did not listen at one time. Remember that, as they are older, I told my students and my friends , it was possible that it was a family and a career ".

Marian Diamond's 4 Ps

The researcher not only focused on important academic positions in the United States, but also traveled around the world to investigate, encourage childhood promotion and attract more women to science.

In 2007, he announced what he called 4 Ps:

  • Personal preference: family and friends
  • Professional priority: brains, colleagues and friends
  • Perseverance: essential
  • Positive attitude: see what is an alternative.

An anecdote recalled by Washington Post reflects the combination of 4 Ps: "Your daughter told Ann when her mother crossed the country, to visit a summer camp. On the plane, she wore two hats: one, one peach cake and another One, of course, the human brain. "

When her mother decided to put her human hat on her hat, Richard remembered it well.

"One day I was looking for something in the house that could lead the brain to some classes." His brain was in a round circle, and when he saw the box, he decided to put it inside when it was perfectly fit. throughout life. It became part of the signing. "


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