Thursday , January 28 2021

Ice does not believe that an airplane crashed through Mississauga's roof of the house does not



A man from Mississauga has said that he and his family should be lucky after a huge ice-rock had fallen from an airplane, which came out of ice on the roof of the house, which came out of his bed.

Tony Caccavo said Global News was hearing about his wife on Wednesdays from 6:30 p.m., and had seen internal damage from the closet room. He called and returned home, around Winston Churchill Boulevard and Collegeway, to see what had happened to the Toronto Pearson International Airport 20 kilometers south.

"I thought I had the leak at the beginning, then built the ice and then fell," said Caccavo.

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"But when I went home, when I called her, I saw the hole and said," There's no need to come in the air. "

The force of the influence poured a few parts of the wind under the bed beneath the feet.

CONGRATULATION: A large part of the ice crashes from Mississauga home





"I was a nutshell. I said:" What the hell? "We're not safe here, even to sleep at home. It's a minute that can change. We're very lucky in one way," said Caccavo.

"Two meters a bit [one] That way, it would be my wife. Four meters [to another] by the side, it would be my son. An hour before, I would go to bed at 6 in the afternoon to work.

According to the statement, the officials' responses were awaiting. Caccavo said that the insurance company agrees to cover the most damage.

According to data from the airport's archived flight, the Las Vegas Flyer plane flew to Boise 767-300 at Crispano neighborhood at 6:29 p.m.

Archived flight data shows a Boeing 767-300 flying across the Caccavo district.

Photography / Toronto Pearson International Airport

The 1854 Las Vegas airliner arrived at the Pearson airport at 6:56 a month, Air Canada spokeswoman said Global News did not know that a "airline-operated" airline company.

The WestJet Flight 1119 in Las Vegas arrived at the Pearson Airport at 6:53 p.m. The air spokesman was not available for comment on Wednesday evening.

Global News contacted Canadian Transportation, the federal aviation officer, on Wednesday night, asked about the incident, but officials did not comment on it.

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TSB examines whether the hoe pierced in the roof of Calgary's house

The spokesman for the Canadian Transport Safety Council, a leading agency in the field of major transportation events, said Global News on Wednesday evening, officials were not investigating.

After questioning the damage, lawyer experts Jock Williams said it is very likely that it comes from the ice plane.

"It takes a kilometer to get the kind of speed you need to penetrate into the roof," said Global News.

"Five kilograms of objects come from 10,000 feet – or 20,000, or whatever – to move from home or from roofs."

Williams does not generate as much ice as the ice crash on the construction of aircraft, but on fine sheets. He speculated on a couple of reasons for falling ice.

"Perhaps when they were driven to the ground, then the ice hole was unlocked," he said, saying that the gears of landing might be leaky.

According to the other theory, concentrated liquids that pump the bulb system on the ground were built inside the compartment doorway and free of charge through the flight.

READ MORE:
Riverbend Home Owner claims he pricked an ice hole on his roof

"Everything you need is a bit of turbulence," said Williams.

"It throws a dingy ice that weighs a couple of kilos, against a very thin and aluminum door that opens the door, the ice falls, the door falls in its place and it is pushed through air pressure."

This type of incident was not surprising, and for this reason, there could be more incidents in inappropriate areas.

"Of course, we will know a lot of these things, that there is never any land in the yard of someone's lands or places," Williams said.

– With Kamil Karamali files

© 2019 Global News, Corus Entertainment Inc. division of the organization


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