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JunoCam images are crafted by Science Art and NASA



Every science and art shows us to see the world differently, and at that time, Candice Hans lives in these worlds, JunoCam is a leading role in the Juno mission to open the crowd to the public exterior camera, Jupiter's orbit.

"I can say that as a scientist people would never have done what I do with our data, but they gave me a new look at Jupiter," said Hansen in an American annual meeting. The Geophysical Union held it in Washington earlier this month. "[Artists] I have really stretched out what Jupiter looks like. "

Hansen sat with Space.com after his presentation, talked about JunoCam's work and how art and science interacted. It has been published in a long and clear interview. [In Photos: Juno’s Amazing Views of Jupiter]

Space.com: How has this program succeeded in the NASA community, and what will you tell me about thinking people are trying to regenerate their success?

Candice Hansen: Succeeded. I want to convey a kind of pro and a cone. This has made it a great way to get people involved and I think that people feel real property in this sense and we have made amazing contributions from the amateur community. The company is getting high data of science from our expansion camera, and we do not analyze a team of scientists.

One of these brown paintings by JunoCam has been seen in Jupiter, that is, on September 6, 2018.

One of these brown paintings by JunoCam has been seen in Jupiter, that is, on September 6, 2018.

Credit: Kevin M. Gill / NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS

Data is so much used to find out what's happening in Jupiter. It's just about cataloging the storms around the sun, analyzing the structure. We have a role in the structure of a large red place, but I think we look at these brown ships today. You know, they could use similar treatment. … We have enough images to make time sequence sequences, where you can draw small white clouds, because the small markers in the atmospheric circulation are very useful. … It's a great thing, I think the public loves us; It's a downside, scientists do not analyze data, but are slowly exploring the data.

So, if I'd advocated NASA, I would like to say: "Go back, but join some scientists in the group and do not throw it out to the public."

Space.com: How has your project changed your point of view between art and science?

Hansen: Where do you draw the line? [between art and science]? I can not draw that line. I thought But I found my web site the first month I started to find it impossible, because of the kind of things that are done with the color of the community of art, when the structure is much more clear than under the Planet Pastel version, which really looks.

You can put them in one side and you can go "Oh, yes, it's here, it's here, and it's there, it's here," but it refers to brain-brain cooperation. Pastries do not pay attention to you the same way. From Jupiter, I can see it in a different way and due to this amazing color, color enhancement, color excess color, artificial color has occurred in some cases.

Some of the images taken on April 1, 2018, passed the Juno Jupiter's pulley, and then JunoCam Amateurs shows the highest band of processed seeds.

Some of the images taken on April 1, 2018, passed the Juno Jupiter's pulley, and then JunoCam Amateurs shows the highest band of processed seeds.

Credit: Gerald Eichstadt / John Rogers / NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS

And, then, I saw an image that I showed with the North Pole and the Stones, I mean, that we can see that it was hanging on my wall, and yet, it has so much detail on the great breeders and why they make wonderful marvels? Rumors and, therefore, understanding of science. But you can also hang up and enjoy on your wall. For me, I thought a lot from the moment I thought. [Jupiter Up Close: Tour the 1st Amazing Flyby Photos by NASA’s Juno Probe]

Space.com: Is there a feature that has never seen the exact structure or type of image?

Hansen: pop-up storms, for example. It was 6th time and lighting – because the lighting changes in each passage were moving in orbit, and the 6th period had perfect lighting to see the pop-up storms. When we got the data of the tropical South zone, I covered them with, "I, Mr., I never remembered." So I returned, I saw Voyager and Cassini and other missions and there were clouds, there were stern storms, but all the previous missions on Jupiter's orbit have had a huge telescope.

JunoCam wore white pop-up storms on October 29, 2018, on the back of the 16th.

JunoCam wore white pop-up storms on October 29, 2018, on the back of the 16th.

Credit: Gerald Eichstädt / Seán Doran / NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS

We had only a bit of a telescope in the mass of the limits of our camera, which means that other missions must be very close to Jupiter to see the same distance resolution. But we have a 58 degree vision; The largest telescopes usually have very narrow viewpoints, so it is a half level. So, when I went back, and compared our resolution with similar resolution to other missions, there probably is little reddish clouds there, but bright clouds. [tiny piece] Jupiter does not know that the southern tropical is full with them.

This was the eye opener. They were there, they were in the pictures, but if it was just seeing Jupiter's little piece of art, it was out of context. They were not visible at six periods during six periods, due to shadows, and so it was just puzzled to the nose, obviously, as it is now, "Yeah They're still there, there they are," but they are not obvious.

Space.com: Did you change your previous experience with Juno and JunoCam?

Hansen: Faith jumped to the public. There was no one to show up. There was a seasonal type, where I was afraid that I would not come to my party. But this did not last long.

Email Meghan Bartels at mbartels@space.com or continue @meghanbartels. Follow us @ Spacedotcom and Facebook. Original Article in Space.com.


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