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Nancy Roman, a "mother of Hubble", died in the space telescope in 93



Nancy Grace Roman was 11 years old, her family lived in Reno, Nevada. The star was excited by the dark nightlife and forming a club of astronomy with friends.

Cosmos was a great fascination.

Nancy Roman, who died on Wednesday, at the age of 93, was the first head of NASA astronomy leadership and the leading agency of the space agency. Roman controlled Early Planning of the Space Telescope Hubble in April 1990, when the Earth's atmosphere began to orbit to capture the unlimited vision of the universe.
Nancy Roman, who died on Wednesday, at the age of 93, was the first head of NASA astronomy leadership and the leading agency of the space agency. Roman controlled Early Planning of the Space Telescope Hubble in April 1990, when the Earth's atmosphere began to orbit to capture the unlimited vision of the universe. (NASA / NYT)

He died on Wednesday in Germantown, Maryland in the year 93, the Romans remembered it as a "mother of Hubble".

NASA's first head of astronomy and the first leading agency of the space agency, according to the Spanish space agency, Roman controlled the early Hubble space telescope planning. In April of 1990, the Earth's atmosphere began to orbit to capture the unlimited vision of the universe.

Founded in the orbit that was considered an ambivalent discovery, Edwin Hubble became the first optical telescope to be the pioneer astronomer of the United States. It has improved the knowledge of our remote solar and planetary galaxy by transmitting distorted images as if it were in the earth's atmosphere.

Highscreen telescope was circulating in the world of science in this type of science, Lyman Spitzer Jr. since the astronomers invented it in 1946. But the concept was skepticism about viability and cost. So Hubble was a long way to reach the heavens.

"The first days that Nancy was online and Google and e-mail and Hubble Space Telescope everything was organized by astronomers to finance the Congress" Edward J. Weiler, the Roman heir. As a senior scientist at Hubble, he said the 2011 Voice Voice.

In addition to the coordination of the efforts made by astronomers and engineers in the development of Hubble, he wrote a Roman testimony to the Hubble spokesman before the Congress and the project approached the Budget Office.

Roman also participated in the development of Cosmic Background Explorer, a satellite launched in 1989, which confirmed the Big Bang Theory of the universe's creation.

At that time, women were followers of women, when science was designating the world of mankind, and advocated for a long time women in science.

"I still remember my high school teacher instead of the second year of the second year of algebra instead of the fifth year of Latin America," he recalled. "He looked down at me and bitterly said:" What lady would take with Latin math? "That was the best reception I got," said the American Voice.

Roman was born on May 16, 1925, in Nashville, Tennessee, the only son of Irwin Roman, the geophysicist and Georgia (Smith) Roman, music teacher. When he was 3 months old, he left the family in Texas and Oklahoma, and his dad advised oil companies to drill.

He moved to Reno, where he was the head of Western federal research on his geophysical father.

"In Reno, of course, the sky was very clear, we had a beautiful place to see the sky and the city's edge at that time," Roman recalled in the 1980s at the National Air and Space Museum. "We had very little light. I started the astronomy club with the girls in the neighborhood. We studied the constellations, read astronomy. I never lost my interest."

The family later went to Baltimore where high school went. He graduated in astronomy at Swarthmore College in 1946 and earned a Ph.D. in astronomy at the Chicago University in 1949. He then worked as a researcher at the Yerkes Observatory.

Later, he joined the Naval Research Laboratory in the United States, specializing in radio astronomy, and contracted by NASA in 1959, one year after its creation.

"It was a challenging challenge that could have had a challenging challenge that could have had an impact on 50 years of astronomy," he recalled at the National Air and Space Museum. .

The Soviet Union Sputnik was launched in October 1957, the satellite could fly. However, the first Roman work was missing from the glamorous crew of the NASA space crew in the 1960s, President John F. Kennedy could make a call to America, a man at the end of the decade on the moon.

Roman retired with NASA in 1979, but continues as a consultant, as Hubble launches work. In 2017, when Lego created 231 female NASA women, the Roman image was a pioneering space between four women.

Roman's death, in a hospital, was confirmed by a cousin, Laura Verreau, reported by The Washington Post. Chevy Chase said he lived in Maryland, and he did not immediately get out.

In the same year, the Romans overwhelmed the spatial investigation aimed at young people, especially in order to promote girls' science. At the end of the decade, Shepherd Elementary School taught at the fifth grade of Washington astronomy.

As he said: "One of the reasons I work with the schools is to persuade the scientist to have a woman, to have fun."


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