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This High-Tech Wristband can be detected by Opioid Overdoses



Photo credit: Carnegie Mellon University

Excessive opioids are a major health problem in the United States, but still a new high-tech bracelet can help clinicians detect signs of serious cancer reactions.

A group of students at Carnegie Mellon HopeBand, a new bracelet used to listen to an alarm, re-ignites and sends a contextual alert to the location of clothing, with low blood oxygen levels, as reported by IEEE. With this high tech bracelet, it allows you to get medical health care to recover overdose.

"Imagine a friend who is always seeing overdose signs, who knows someone who understands your use pattern and when he is in contact [someone] help and support, "said Rachmi Kalkunte, a software engineer at the University of Carnegie Mellon, from IEEE," designed by HopeBand. "

Unlike other medical devices, students from Carnegie Mellon University's "HopeBand & # 39; It is an inexpensive portable device to track people's health everywhere. Pinney Associates, sponsored by a pharmaceutical consultant, has advanced the way the stopwatch with a watch style that takes advantage of the pulse meter as an overdose detector.

The pulse oximeter senses the blood oxygen levels with the high-tech process. LED lights shine brightly and then detect light absorption changes. If oxygen level is low, for too much potential, HopeBand evaluates a 10-second warning signal before hearing an alarm.

Although HopeBand overdoses could expect it, the team still serves to detect real-world warning signals. Despite this challenge, the team has used simulated entries to test HopeBand and have had positive results.

Following the test, the group hopes to distribute free HopeBands to opioid users through local skull exchange programs. If this distribution step is successful, the group can sell the marketed version of HopeBand for $ 16 and $ 20 in the future.

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