Wednesday , October 20 2021

"Tipping Point": Edmonton's high school seams



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School committees expect Edmonton high school classrooms to exceed their limits over the next four years, adapted to growing populations of student centers, construction extensions, multipurpose room spaces, and online learning tools.

Four major Edmonton schools are considered to be abilities and half of Edmonton schools have a capacity of 94 percent or more based on 2018 enrollment numbers.

In Edmonton, public school and the Catholic School, high schools are expected to be up until 2022.

"I've watched classes in gyms, I've learned to learn classes, learn or learn libraries," said Michelle Draper Edmonton School of Public School Board.

In the last two years, seven new Catholic schools and 13 public schools have been opened, but none of these new buildings are in high schools. The main demand for the Edmonton Public Administration budget is New Edmonton's new Meadows school.

In Mill Woods, J. Percy Page High School has a capacity of 108 percent and Holy Trinity, a Catholic high school high school, is 119 percent.

The Holy Trinity is currently modernizing, but we still do not have enough room for students to complete the project.

"If you predicted that this modernization would end if there were no abilities," said John Fiacco, assistant to the educational planning for Catholic Edmonton.

Catholic Edmonton has applied for a high school high school in the Heritage Valley as part of the budget plan. Fiacco said that Mill Woods will facilitate some space concerns, but these plans are still awaiting approval from the province.

"These are hopes and dreams of infrastructure without money," he said.

One of Edmonton's eldest students, feeling the crisis

Harry Ainlay High School, from Whitgood Center in Whitemud, is Edmonton's highest school.

About 2,600 enrolled students, a 96-percent capacity and only 200 students added last year.

Nour Abdelhakim, 11 high school students, has learned about 2,600 schools, but sometimes they are locked up amongst students. (Ariel Fournier)

Nour Abdelhakim, 11 senior students at Harry Ainlay, said there are many challenges in having a lot of students in a building.

"He goes to stories, that's why he's getting out of class and getting to the nearest bathroom as quickly as possible," Abdelhakim said.

The classrooms are full of Harry Ainlay's corridors.

Principal, Gane Olsen, said that it was more difficult for students to move from one class to the next year, when workers were repaired after closing down the downtown core of the center of the building.

"Our rotunda corners would take a few minutes," Olsen said.

Since its reopening, students can cut across the middle too quickly, he said, but sometimes it can be difficult.

In order to facilitate some convergence, he added a new crown crown at the cafeteria in 2016, leaving 300 seats in the coffee tables.

Large graduates adjusting to size restrictions

Harry Ainlay is one of the high school high schools in Edmonton for more students to attend school.

Harry Ainlay, Gane Olson, took part in the school in 1966, opened the year and sent 10 children to school. (Ariel Fournier)

"The administrator is very creative and very proactive," said Fiacco.

Some schools said they have done a computer lab and have used it for a number of occasions, and in some cases, schools should use classroom space in upper-level higher-level school buildings.

The head of the public school committee Draper said the need for a new school is worth $ 79 million in price tag.

Building a baccalaureate would be almost three times more expensive than the average elementary school, but the number of students is less than double.

The administrator is very creative and very proactive.– John Fiacco, Assistant Superintendent of the Catholic School of Edmonton

But Draper said the expansions require much more attention to addressing the growing population of new colleges.

"It's a tipping point, where it becomes more expensive to innovate and modernize to build a 21st century learning and more sense to build a new structure," he said.

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