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Scientists medicate mosquitoes to fight malaria – Lifestyle today – Uruguay and the latest news of the World are updated



Research, directed by the Public Health School T.H. Chan of the Harvard Universityhe showed atovaquone drugIt is administered by people who treat malaria and treat it, these insects are also effective.

While human beings are oral, they absorb mosquitoes in the legs, when they are contacted by applying an atovaquone surface, such as the mosquito beds.

Experts believe that the mosquito treated with this drug in 2000 was blocking the development of the "parasite" Plasmodium falciparum parasite.

"Mosquitoes are very resistant organisms and they have developed resistance against all the insecticides used to kill them. By eliminating the parasites of the malaria parasites, instead of dying, we can effectively prevent malaria transmission," he says. A statement by Flaminia Catteruccia, professor of immunology and infectious diseases.

In his opinion, the use of mosquito networks can help this "destructive illness" to be "a simple but innovative idea" that is "safe" for people and also "respect for the environment". ".

Over the last 20 years, insecticides have been prevented by almost 68% of malaria cases applied to mosquito networks, although some species have recently recovered the most common repressors (pirotroids, homes, and agriculture).

For this study, scientists have found female Anopheles mosquito mosquitoes responsible for atovaquone compounds, to apply prophylactic abilities to block and develop Plasmodium falciparum parasite.

Insects detected parasites completely atoloconos (100 micrometres per square meter) and six minute exposure concentrations that were relatively small, to pass through mosquito nets treated with insecticide.

Experts have similar results with other similar drugs, although underlined by atovaquone, it does not have any effect on life expectancy or mosquito reproductive abilities.

"When we used mechanical data in real world prevalent insecticide resistance, mosquito protection and malaria, an additional use of a compound like atovaquone could reduce malaria transmission to almost malaria. We had data in Africa," said Douglas Paton, chief author of research.


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