Friday , July 19 2019
Home / vietnam / At room temperature, RMIT scientists converted CO2 into CO2, buried in the ground

At room temperature, RMIT scientists converted CO2 into CO2, buried in the ground



Scientists achieved success at CO2 In order to become a compact coal, the new achievements bring about efforts to reduce emissions and limit climate change to the whole new level. The research team led by the RMIT University has developed new techniques using an electrolytic metering method in the CO converter solution2 Carbon at solid atmospheric particles at room temperature.

In a study published in nature, the authors state that technology offers a way of combining CO2 "safe and sustainable".

At room temperature, RMIT scientists converted coal to CO2, buried in the ground - Photo 1.

Today's carbon capture techniques are becoming mainly carbon liquid and are stored in different ways. However, there are two obstacles: liquid spills from storage sites, economic and dangerous emissions.

But in a new way, solid carbon blocks become carbon, almost coal. Storage will be much easier and probably reusable.

Transforming CO2 In a solid, the researchers use catalysts with metallic solutions, a surface designed specifically for electricity efficiently. Electricity will be included in carbon dioxide in an experimental glass, with a small metal solution with an electrolytic solution. CO2 Gradually they will become a solid array through electrolytic tests.

Professor Torten Daeneke, according to RMIT, said: "We can not save time, but it turns carbon dioxide into coal, and then buries the earth.".

"Until now, we can not activate CO2 In a very solid high temperature, so it is difficult to scale the CO treatment scale2. Using metal catalyst solutions, we create new channels for effective and new conversion processes.".

Daenek acknowledges that he needs more research, but this is the first step.

At room temperature, RMIT scientists converted coal to CO2, buried in ground - photo 2.

Both teachers of the RMIT are Torben Daeneke and Dorna Esrafilzadeh.

Prof. Dr. Dorna Esrafilzahed, head of the research group, spoke of the use of carbon product for electrode production.

"There is another possibility of the benefit of the new carbon dioxide conversion process, that is to say, the current feature, to become a superconstructor to access future vehicle systems.".

He added: "Carbon dioxide solidification & # 39; The process also generates synthetic fuels that can be used in industries".

Everything seems very good to be true.


Source link