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Cultural practices enhance indigenous women's health by recovering from the trauma of partners' violence



Indigenous women help improve the health of women recovering from the victims 'victims' traumas, the healing process that integrates guardian circles and other cultural elements in search of new British Columbia and Western University research.

The only study program demonstrated an effective "Spirituos Reclaiming" program, centered on women working in six-month-old women, week-long circles or group activities. The last activities shared personal stories and aspects of indigenous cultures through ceremonial, cultural education and traditional crafts.

The approach was developed with the help of old indigenous and advisory people.

"At the end of the program, women had less trauma and depression symptoms and better quality of life, how they felt at the beginning," said Colleen Varcoe, UBC's top clinical researcher. "The participants felt their personal capacity more and felt for their family and community."

As a result, at least six months later, Varcoe was added.

Participants were attended by 152 different nations and indigenous women living in Vancouver and Surrey, B.C. Most survivors of childhood survival in a school of residence, in addition to the violence of their partners; all of which were much lower than average Canadian income and racism and discrimination on a regular basis.

The study highlights the importance of holistic approach to the violence for the indigenous survival of violence, Roberta Price's researcher, Coast Salish Snuneymuxw and Cowichan Nations.

"With regard to these women, treatments can be much more efficient if they integrate and integrate indigenous beings, such as sharing culture through contrasts, teachings and ceremonies," said Price.

The IHEAL-based program has been investigating the health promotion program developed by researchers a few years ago in the three provinces to ensure that women have a good impact on women, among indigenous women.

"Canadian indigenous women have a high rate of violence from their own partners, yet there are some specially designed interventions based on evidence," said Varco. "With our IHEAL hope, we can push the situation around."


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