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The drought threatens thousands of African Flamingo Chicks



Rescue hundreds depleted Flamingo chips grow in a South African drought to save birds from a Cape Town sanctuary to save them from dead and water.

The birthplace of the Kamfers Dam in the North is the only breeding bird of the three famous African birds, Namibia and other Botswana women, according to researcher Katta Ludynia.

Flamingo chick has been rescued in the northwestern province of the SANCCOB rehabilitation center in Cape Town, South Africa, on January 30, 2019.

Flamingo chick has been rescued in the northwestern province of the SANCCOB rehabilitation center in Cape Town, South Africa, on January 30, 2019.

Small rescues have a duration of three to four months, and it's not clear whether or not Cape Town will recover in the woods or go to Kimberley, which is more than a hundred kilometers away.

"There are still thousands of birds with mammals in the areas where water is still present," said Katherine Ludynia, researcher at the Fisheries Conservation Watershed Foundation (SANCCOB). "Now, how are these birds allowed to water?"

Ludynia said that the sanctuary was cared for seven times, when most of them were dehydrated on Monday, they were looking for food when their parents abandoned it.

Chicks were taken to the sanctuary by plane and by road.

A non-rescue flamingo chick emerges from a prey in the Iparralde province to the rehabilitation center of SANCCOB for refurbishment center in South Africa on January 30, 2016.

A non-rescue flamingo chick emerges from a prey in the Iparralde province to the rehabilitation center of SANCCOB for refurbishment center in South Africa on January 30, 2016.

SANCCOB is one of several centers in South Africa that cares about 2,000 pigs rescued by the dam.

Although it is one of the largest flamingo mountain ranges in South Africa, Kamfers Dam, north of Kimberley, often dries and mainly depends on rain water. Water has also acquired water from the wastewater treatment plant from wetlands.

"The Kimberly Dam is very important because it is handy, so we can guarantee the level of water. In South Africa, it may be the only site that can grow flamingos if the drought continues in other areas," said Ludynia.


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